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01 October 2016

EFSP's Dazzling Dozen: At Home in Antiquity

Today is the opening of the exhibition Alma-Tadema, At Home in Antiquity at the Fries Museum in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. The Dutch-born painter Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) was the most successful and seductive storyteller of his day. He accomplished this by an innovative use of space in his work. Through his great knowledge of archaeology and classical antiquity he managed to bring the days of ancient Rome to life in paintings. His scenes were received so enthusiastically all over the world that our present image of classical antiquity was influenced by them. In the European cinema and in Hollywood too, Alma-Tadema’s interpretation caught on and became the basis for seminal films about this era, from the Italian epics of the 1910s to Ridley Scott's Gladiator (2000).Today 12 postcards about films, inspired by the work of this remarkable artist, who probably had been a filmmaker had he lived later.

Gli ultimi giorni di Pompei (1913)
German postcard by Rodera-Lichtspiele, Dresden, 1913. Publicity still for the Italian silent epic Gli ultimi giorni di Pompei/The Last Days of Pompeii (Eleuterio Rodolfi, 1913). From left to right: Antonio Grisanti as Arbaces, the Egyptian High Priest of Isis; Cesare Gani Carini as Apecides, a disciple of Arbaces and the brother of Jone; Eugenia Tettoni Fior as Jone; Ubaldo Stefani as Glaucus, Jone's lover; and Fernanda Negri Pouget as the blind slave Nidia. The film was produced by Società Anonima Ambrosio.

Spartaco
Italian postcard. Photo: publicity still for Spartaco (Enrico Vidali, 1913). Caption: Valeria si intrattiene con Mirza parlando di Spartaco (Valeria sits with Mirza, talking about Spartacus). Spartaco's sister Mirza (Cristina Ruspoli) has become the slave of Crassus' daughter Valeria (Maria Gandini). Valeria becomes interested in Spartacus because of what Mirza tells about him. In other versions Mirza is called Idamis, and Valeria Elena.

Quo vadis?
Italian postcard Photo: Cines. Publicity still for the early epic Quo vadis? (Enrico Guazzoni, 1913), adapted from Henryk Sienkiewicz's classic novel and the biggest film hit of 1913 worldwide. Caption: The death of the gladiator. This image cites Jean-Léon Gérôme's famous painting Pollice verso (Thumbs down, 1872) and was often used in the publicity for the film. In the back the emperor Nero (Carlo Cattaneo) makes the sign of thumbs down, sign for the conqueror to kill his adversary. Flanking Nero are left Tigellinus (Cesare Moltini) and right Petronius (Gustavo Serena). Left of the imperial box the Vestal Virgins are seated.

Elena Sangro in Fabiola (1918)
Spanish postcard for Amatller Marca Luna Chocolate, Series 8. Photo: Palatino Film. Elena Sangro as Fabiola and signora Poletti as her niece Agnese in Enrico Guazzoni's Fabiola (1918). When the persecutions of the Christians in Rome become too rough, Fabiola takes her niece Agnese to her villa in the countryside.

Quo Vadis? (1924)
Italian postcard by Edizione L'Argentografica, Torino. Publicity still for the Italo-German epic Quo Vadis? (Gabriellino D'Annunzio, Georg Jacoby, 1924), one of the many adaptations of the classic novel by Henryk Sienkiewicz, with Lilian Hall-Davis as Licia.

Rina de Liguoro in Quo Vadis? (1924)
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, Berlin, no. 699/6, 1919-1924. Photo: Filmhaus Brückmann. Publicity still for Quo Vadis? (Gabriellino D'Annunzio, Georg Jacoby, 1924) with Rina De Liguoro.

Alma-Tadema defined our picture of Roman antiquity


Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema's painted scenes appeal to the imagination and are totally convincing. Even though we may not be aware of it, our picture of Roman antiquity has been largely defined by Alma-Tadema.

The exhibition explores how this came to be by very closely following Alma-Tadema’s personal life and artistic career.

No one could paint as convincingly as Alma-Tadema, so it is hardly surprising that Cinecittá and Hollywood were only too eager to convert his paintings into moving images for their Roman spectacles.

From the silent era on, film directors were after all looking for a visual language for the new mass medium of film and Alma-Tadema provided them with the blueprint for it. And this continues on to this day.

Director Ridley Scott studied Alma-Tadema when making his successful films Gladiator (2000) and Exodus (2014). Scott’s production designer, Arthur Max, sees Alma-Tadema as someone who shows us Rome as we want it to look like, not necessarily as it really was.

Gli ultimi giorni di Pompei (1926)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 53/2. Photo: Hisa. Publicity still for the Italian silent epic Gli ultimi giorni di Pompei/The Last Days of Pompeii (Carmine Gallone, Amleto Palermi, 1926). The film was based on the 1834 novel The Last Days of Pompeii by Edward Bulwer-Lytton. On the photo, Glaucus (Victor Varconi) listens to beautiful and rich Greek Ione (Rina De Liguoro) playing the harp. The statue left was copied from an original Roman one.

Charles Laughton, Claudette Colbert in The Sign of the Cross (1932)
British postcard in the series Film Shots by Film Weekly. Photo: Paramount. Publicity still of The Sign of the Cross (Cecil B. De Mille, 1932) with Claudette Colbert and Charles Laughton.

Fredric March in The Sign of the Cross (1932)
British postcard in the series Film Shots by Film Weekly. Photo: Paramount. Publicity still for The Sign of the Cross (Cecil B. De Mille, 1932) with Fredric March.

Quo Vadis
Italian postcard by A. Mondadori, Verona. Publicity still for Quo Vadis (Mervyn LeRoy, Anthony Mann, 1951). Caption: In Rome, Italy, Technicolor cameras film a scene for M.G.M.'s Quo Vadis. Roman soldiers parade before Nero's palace here.

Yul Brynner in The Ten Commandments (1956)
French postcard by Editions P.I., Paris, no. 831, 1956. Photo: Paramount Pictures Inc. Yul Brynner as Ramses in The Ten Commandments (Cecil B. DeMille, 1956).

Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011)
Belgian postcard by SB (Uitgeverij Best), Antwerpen (Antwerp). Photo: still for Cleopatra (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1963) with Elizabeth Taylor.


Alma-Tadema in film. Source: Fries Museum (YouTube).

Sources: Fries Museum and Eye.

30 September 2016

Johnny Kraaykamp

Today is the final day of the Netherlands Film Festival (NFF), and also of EFSP's Unofficial Netherlands Film Postcard Festival (UNFPF). Today's star is John Kraaykamp, Sr. (1925–2011), one of The Netherlands' most popular comedians, praised for his perfect timing. For years, he formed a comedy team with Rijk de Gooyer as Johnny & Rijk. He also played in more serious plays and films, including the Academy Award winning WW II film drama De aanslag/The Assault (1986).

Johnny Kraaykamp
Dutch card.

Johnny Kraaykamp
Dutch card by Anova, Amsterdam.

Boy Soprano


Johnny Kraaykamp (also written as Kraaijkamp) was born as Jan Hendrik Kraaijkamp in Amsterdam, The Netherlands in 1925. He was one of four children of a greengrocer and a house cleaner. He grew up in the Kinkerbuurt in Amsterdam. After an accident, his father was declared unfit for work and Johnny had to find work at a young age.

At 14, he already performed as a boy soprano in the famous Amsterdam theatre Carré. He worked for a short while as an acrobat, but then moved on to become a singer in a show orchestra. He performed as an entertainer and bass player in local bars, where he was discovered in the 1950s by Rijk de Gooyer.

Together they recorded the song Twee jongens op een gitaar (Two guys on a guitar). It was the start of a long and successful partnership. Johnny and Rijk began to perform together on radio and television. In spring 1956, they joined the Weekendshow, a popular entertainment show on the Dutch radio. They also toured with the Snip & Snap Revue and performed in several comedy plays written for TV, together and apart.

In 1962, they got together again for Open het dorp (Open the village), an extremely well-watched TV benefit marathon presented by Mies Bouwman, in which they performed in their pyjamas. In the 1960s and 1970s they performed regularly together on Dutch TV. In 1964, they began with the Johnny & Rijk shows. In their shows, Rijk was the ‘feeder’ and John the comedian. The duo also recorded a couple of hit singles, including De Bostella (The Bostella), for which they received a golden record in 1968. They even had a show on German TV, Spass durch Zwei/Fun By Two (Bob Rooijens, 1970-1971).

Johnny also appeared in several Dutch films, including Daniël (Erik Terpstra, 1971), Geen paniek/No Panic (Ko Koedijk, 1973) with Rijk de Gooyer, De vijf van de vierdaagse/The Five Are Marching In (René van Nie, 1974), Heb medelij Jet/Happy Days Are Here Again (Frans Weisz, 1975), Zwaarmoedige verhalen voor bij de centrale verwarming/Melancholy Tales (Nouchka van Brakel a.o., 1975) and the anthology film Vroeger kon je lachen/One Could Laugh in Former Days (Bert Haanstra, 1983), with adaptations of ironic newspaper-columns by the Dutch author Simon Carmiggelt. In Germany Kraaykamp appeared in the sex comedy Die Stoßburg/The Sex Castle (Franz Marischka, 1974) and in Belgium in the drama Verbrande brug/Burned Bridges (Guido Henderickx, 1975) with Yves Beneyton.

Johnny Kraaykamp
Dutch postcard by Gebr. Spanjersberg N.V., Rotterdam, no. 1109. Photo: Artone.

Rijk de Gooijer and Johnny Kraaykamp
Johnny Kraaykamp and Rijk de Gooijer. Dutch postcard by Editions Altona, Amsterdam / Gebr. Spanjersberg, Rotterdam. Photo: Telefunken.

Pig-headed Old Man


In 1973, John Kraaykamp made a couple of TV shows without Rijk de Gooyer, but with Tonny Huurdeman as his new feeder. De Gooyer had started a successful film career. Unfortunately, these shows were not very successful: the show only lasted three episodes. Later a series of Johnny Kraaykamp Shows was more successful. In 1985, he joined old partner De Gooyer in the TV series De Brekers/The Brekers (Rob Herzet, 1985-1988), which co-starred Adèle Bloemendaal.

Kraaykamp also played in a couple of prestigious films in the 1980s, including De Wisselwachter/The Pointsman (Jos Stelling, 1986) and Iris (Mady Saks, 1987), with Monique van de Ven. His most successful film was De aanslag/The Assault (Fons Rademakers, 1986), in which he played an old resistance fighter opposite Derek de Lint.

Kraaykamp also was a prolific stage actor. With theatre company Ensemble he played in The Taming of the Shrew from 1958 to 1959. From 1962 to 1964 he was a member of the Amsterdams Volkstoneel. He also starred in a couple of musicals, including Irma la Douce (1962–1964) and Man of La Mancha (1969–1970).

After a period of comic plays, he joined the Ro Theater in 1979 to play in a number of classic roles. The title role in William Shakespeare's King Lear that year is considered his big breakthrough as a serious actor. He also performed in A Midsummer Night's Dream. In 1984 he won the Louis d'Or, the most prestigious award in stage acting in The Netherlands, for his lead role in Denis Diderot's Jacques de fatalist en zijn meester (Jack, the fatalist and his master).

From 1988 on, he starred on TV in the prison sitcom Laat maar zitten/Leave Them in Jail (John van de Rest, 1988-1991), based on the British TV series Porridge. His most successful role in later years was the part of Piet Boverkerk in the comedy series Het zonnetje in huis/Sunshine at Home (Hans de Korte, 1993-2003). In the show, he played a pig-headed old man that comes to live with his son and daughter-in-law (played by his own son, John Kraaijkamp, Jr, and Martine Bijl) after his wife passed away. The show was a remake of the British sitcom Tom, Dick and Harriet, created by Cooke and Mortimer.

Kraaykamp's last film was the successful child drama Kruimeltje/Little Crumb (Maria Peters, 1999) featuring Ruud Feltkamp. John Kraaijkamp died in 2011 in Laren. He was 86. Kraaijkamp was married three times and had four children. With Riemada Elisabeth Panhuysen, he had two children, son John (1954) and daughter Ellissigne. With his second wife, Tilly van Duijkeren, he had a son, Michiel. With Mai Lun Lee he had a daughter, Sanne. John, Ellissigne and Sanne became actors. Throughout his life, Kraaykamp received several acting awards. Besides the Louis d'Or in 1984, he received the Golden Calf (the Dutch Oscar) in 1986 for his roles in the films De aanslag/The Assault and De Wisselwachter.


Johnny & Rijk sing De Bostella. Source: TopPop (YouTube).


American trailer for De aanslag/The Assault. Source: The Best Foreign Movies (YouTube).

Sources: Beeld en Geluid (Dutch), Wikipedia (Dutch) and IMDb.

29 September 2016

Lien Deyers

During the Netherlands Film Festival, EFSP presents the traditional Unofficial Dutch Film Star Postcards Festival. Today's post is about Lien Deyers (1910-1965?). She was discovered by famous director Fritz Lang who gave her a part in Spione/Spies (1928). During eight years, she acted in 32 late silent and early sound films. After 1935 her star faded rapidly and her life ended in tragedy.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5315/1, 1930-1931 Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deijers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4714/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Universal.

Lien Deijers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5423/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Lola-Kreutzberg-Film.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5771/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Alex Binder.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross-Verlag, no. 6922/2, 1931-1932. Photo: Atelier Binder. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6104/2, 1931-1932. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Fritz Lang


Lien Deyers was born in Amsterdam as Nicolina Spanier. She was the daughter of Nathan Spanier, piano teacher, and Johanna Liefjes, seamstress. She had a half-brother, Andries Liefjes. After Spanier’s death mrs. Liefjes married the hotel-owner Egbert Dijjers and the family moved to The Hague. In 1931 Lien officially changed her name to Dijjers Spanier but would occasionally also use the name Dijjers Liefjes. At several times she stated her year of birth being 1910 or 1911, but some sources mention 1909 as the year of her birth.

She lived her childhood years in Amsterdam and later The Hague until her stepfather, owner of a big hotel in The Hague, married the Austrian actress Lotte Erol. Lien then traveled between The Hague, Vienna (where the family mostly lived) and Lausanne, where she went to a private school and became fluent in French. In August 1926 the Austrian weekly Mein Film staged a competition for new young screen talent and Lien submitted her photograph. Together with twenty other contestants she was chosen for a screen-test by director Hans Otto, which she won.

During an autograph session in the Mein Film offices in 1927, she was introduced to the Austrian director Fritz Lang. Reportedly, the Dutch teenager cheekily asked him: “Herr Lang, don’t you want to discover me?” The endeared director offered the self-assured little blonde girl a plum part in his next project, the thriller Spione/Spies (Fritz Lang, 1928) opposite Rudolf Klein-Rogge and Gerda Maurus. Lang had her travel to Berlin for a screentest and she was indeed given a secondary but racy role in Spione. She was billed as Lien Deyers because Dijjers was frequently misspelled or mispronounced in German speaking countries.

Lang had her sign a six-year contract and assigned her to the huge Ufa studios in Berlin. The contract soon turned out to be mere slavery, and Deyers sought a court decision to end it. In November 1928 the court ruled in her favour, a verdict welcomed by hundreds of Berlin-based actors with similar contracts. In turn Lang appealed and was granted a 10,000 Reichs-mark pay-off, to be fulfilled in monthly payments. Deyers and Lang had already grown to dislike each other during the shooting of Spione.

Her role as an alluring and seductive spy in Spione meant the start of a prolific film career in the German cinema for Lien. In the next two years she starred in films like Haus Nummer 17/Number 17 (Géza von Bolváry, 1928), Die Heilige und ihr Narr/The Saint and Her Fool (Wilhelm Dieterle, 1928) and the French adventure Le Capitaine Fracasse/Captain Fracasse (Alberto Cavalcanti, Henry Wulschleger, 1929) starring Pierre Blanchar.

Wilhelm Dieterle, Lien Deijers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 101/1, 1927-1928. Photo: Defina / DEFU. Publicity still for Die Heilige und ihr Narr/The Saint and her Fool (Wilhelm Dieterle, 1928) with Wilhelm Dieterle.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4283/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Balázs, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4283/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Balázs, Berlin.

Lien Deyers
Lien Deyers
German postcards by Ross Verlag, no. 4890/1 and 4890/2, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Balázs, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
Austrian postcard by Iris Verlag, no. 5693. Photo: Manassé, Wien. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
Austrian postcard by Iris-Verlag, no. 5694. Photo: Manassé.

Starring Parts


After eight silent films, Lien Deyers had also success with her early sound films. She enchanted the public with her appearances in films like Rosenmontag/Rose Monday (Hans Steinhoff, 1930), Die Männer um Lucie/The Men Around Lucie (Alexander Korda, 1931) starring Liane Haid, and the operetta Die Verliebte Firma/The Company's in Love (Max Ophüls, 1932) with Gustav Fröhlich.

She starred opposite Heinz Rühmann in the comedy hits Der Mann, der seinen Mörder sucht/Looking for His Murderer (Robert Siodmak, 1931) and Lachende Erben/Laughing Heirs (Max Ophüls, 1933).

Opposite the popular singer Richard Tauber, she appeared in Melodie der Liebe/Right to Happiness (Georg Jacoby, 1932), and opposite another singing star, Jan Kiepura in Ich liebe alle Frauen/I Love All Women (Carl Lamac, 1935).

In the interesting Sci-Fi film Gold (Karl Hartl, 1934) she played with Hans Albers and Brigitte Helm.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4770/1, 1929-1930. Photo: Atelier Schrecker, Berlin. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5274/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Atelier Binder. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5274/2, 1930-1931. Photo: Atelier Binder, Berlin.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5503/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Ufa.

Lien Deijers and Heinz Rühmann
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5563/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Ufa. Publicity still for Der Mann, der seinen Mörder sucht/Looking for His Murderer (Robert Siodmak, 1931) with Heinz Rühmann.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5950/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Ufa.

Lien Deijers, Roland Varno, Dolly Bouwmeester
Dutch postcard for De sensatie der toekomst (Dimitri Buchowetzki, Jack Salvatori, 1931) with Roland Varno and Dolly Bouwmeester.

The Sensation of the Future


Lien Deyers' only part in a Dutch film was in De sensatie der toekomst/Television (Dimitri Buchowetzki, Jack Salvatori, 1931) starring Dolly Bouwmeester and Roland Varno.

This early and little known Dutch sound film was shot at the Paramount studio's in Joinville in France. The subject was the new phenomenon television, 'the sensation of the future.

De sensatie der toekomst/Television was the Dutch version of the French film Magie moderne/Modern Magic (Dimitri Buchowetzki, 1931). With different casts, there were also an Italian, a Czech, a Polish, a Romanian and a Swedish version produced in the same studio.

Deyers had given up her Dutch nationality when she married merican born German producer and director Alfred Zeisler. Zeisler had directed her in Sein Scheidungsgrund/His Grounds for Divorce (1931) and had produced Gold. Therefore Lien wasn't subject to the foreign-worker quota restrictions of the National Socialists.

Lien was terrified that her family tree would be investigated by the Nazis: her father, a hotel owner in the Hague, was half Jewish. Her husband was also Jewish. The couple decided to leave Germany.

Among Lien's last films were Ein ganzer Kerl/A Regular Fellow (Carl Boese, 1935) and Die Selige Exzellenz (Hans H. Zerlett, 1935). The pair left for England first.

Lien Deyers and Johannes Riemann in Sein Scheidungsgrund (1931)
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6105/1, 1931-1932. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute. Publicity still for Sein Scheidungsgrund/His Grounds for Divorce (Alfred Zeisler, 1931) with Johannes Riemann.

Lien Deyers, Walter Edthofer
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6533/1, 1931-1932. Photo: Siegel-Monopolfilm. Still from Der Herzog von Reichstadt/The Duke of Reichstadt (Victor Tourjansky, 1931) with Walter Edthofer. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deijers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6922/1, 1931-1932. Photo: Atelier Binder, Berlin.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag. Photo: Atelier Binder, Berlin.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6552/1, 1931-1932. Photo: Ufa. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 608 (Luxus series). Photo: Atelier Binder. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Lien Deyers
Dutch postcard by J.S.A., no. 189. Photo: Lux Film.

Setback


Lien Deyers traveled between London and The Hague while her man worked in England. In 1937 she signed for a major role in the Dutch-Italian film De Drie Wensen/I Tre Desideri/Three Wishes. For unknown reasons she did not play the part and finally joined her husband in London in 1938. There was no need for her acting skills there.

By that time her marriage with Alfred Zeissler was faltering and a divorce was inevitable. In 1939 the couple moved to California where they soon went their different ways. Lien Deyers couldn't find work in the film business in Hollywood, and conducted a business for novelties. According to Wikipedia she had a reputation now of being 'mentally extremely unstable'.

She developed an alcohol addiction and relied financially on old contacts like the German actor and director William Dieterle and in particular the Austrian-American film producer Paul Kohner and his European Film Fund that he had founded to aid down-on-their-luck German actors in exile.

Over a brief period of time she married three more times: with kingpin actors' agent Frank Orsatti, one of the Orsatti Brothers (who evidently couldn't get her involved in films either), from 1940 until 1942, with furrier Victor Rubin (from 1944 until 1948) and with Lawrence Adlon, grandson of the Berlin hotel-magnate, in January 1951.

In the following decades her private life was marked with some setbacks. Lien became an alcoholic. The Dutch actor/comedian Wim Sonneveld met with her in 1957 during the shooting of Silk Stockings with Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse, in which he played a supporting role. He was reportedly shocked by her faded beauty.

Then, she completely vanished from the public view. The last time she was heard from, was in September 1964, when she was in the Clark County Jail in Las Vegas because of loitering and disorderly conduct.

Thomas Staedeli at Cyranos: "The time of her death is not ascertainable, (...) but it seems that she died in 1965". Wikipedia mentions a greeting card congratulating German actor and former co-star Heinz Rühmann on his eightieth birthday in 1982. The postcard was signed L. Dyers-Wallburg, suggesting she had gotten married for a fifth time. IMDb has 1982 as the year of her death.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 5771/1, 1930-1931. Photo: Alex Binder.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 6536/1, 1931-1932. Photo: Atelier Binder. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Instituut.

Lien Deyers and Georg Alexander in  Ist mein Mann nicht fabelhaft? (1933)
Dutch postcard by City Film, no. 277. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute. Publicity still for Ist mein Mann nicht fabelhaft?/Isn't My Husband Wonderful? (Georg Jacoby, 1933) with Georg Alexander.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 7194/1, 1932-1933. Photo: Atelier Binder, Berlin.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 7749/1, 1932-1933. Photo: Atelier Binder, Berlin.

Lien Deyers
German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 8842/1, 1933-1934. Photo: Atelier Manassé, Wien. Collection: Geoffrey Donaldson Institute.

Sources: Adrian Stahlecker (Nederlandse acteurs in de Weimarrepubliek en Nazi-Duitsland - Dutch), Thomas Staedeli (Cyranos), Filmportal.de, Wikipedia (English and Dutch) and IMDb.